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  • Paperback
  • 336 pages
  • Anyone here been raped & speaks English?
  • Edward Samuel Behr
  • English
  • 05 October 2019
  • 0450053601

About the Author: Edward Samuel Behr

Edward Samuel Behr was a journalist he worked primarily as a foreign war correspondent He began his career in the early 1950s with the Reuters news agency, then worked for Time Life, serving as bureau chief in several cities around the world for Time Magazine He then took a position with Newsweek in 1965 as Asia bureau chief, based in Hong Kong Later in his career, Mr Behr also made a number of documentaries for the BBC He wrote several books during his life on various subjects, including a memoir which was published in 1978.



10 thoughts on “Anyone here been raped & speaks English?

  1. says:

    I read this ages ago, but it sticks It s a war correspondant s memoir, and provides a really good insight into the process of how people become inured to shocking things, and how they compartmentalize these experiences with geography It s also funny, which is hard to do when you re up to your knees in blackened bloated bodies Qudos

  2. says:

    I like memoirs of journalists and humanitarian workers You would find in them details and stories within large historical events that would compliment history books and illustrate them with names, faces, and events that would make themeasy to imagine and understand This is the case particularly when they are well written by a traveller who is observant and who has a good command of his language and imagery.Edward Behr is a great journalist and has been a foreign correspondent in a partic I like memoirs of journalists and humanitarian workers You would find in them details and stories within large historical events that would compliment history books and illustrate them with names, faces, and events that would make themeasy to imagine and understand This is the case particularly when they are well written by a traveller who is observant and who has a good command of his language and imagery.Edward Behr is a great journalist and has been a foreign correspondent in a particularly interesting period of the Twentieth Century Having been a soldier in British India and in Indonesia in the Second World War and then a foreign correspondent working for Reuters, Time Life, and freelancing his way through Pakistan, India, Algeria, Congo, China, Hong Kong, and Vietnam.He has been lucky or unlucky, depending on how you look at things enough to live through the wars of independent in Algeria, sit for dinner with Chairman Mao, and go through the rough battle fields of Vietnam war including witnessing the Tet offensive in 1968 He writes about all that rigorously but with a personal touch that is easy to follow and sympathise with Unlike some others, he doesn t come across as a violence obsessed psychopath but as a sympathetic human being who likes and believes in what he does.I bought this book for nearly nothing from a pile of used books attracted by the weird title which is something he didn t say himself but heard being yelled in the Congo by a BBC journalist and it lived on my shelf for a couple of years before I picked it up I am always happy when such a happy coincidence happens and almost never regret stopping by used book places even when a good book only comes my way once every long while this is specifically when a book like this, published in 1979 and long out of print, is the harvest of the day

  3. says:

    Interesting memoir of a Cold War journalist It chronicles his life from his WWII service in the Indian Army, through assignments in several war zones including the Sino Indian War, Algeria, Congo, and Vietnam He offers interesting insights and anecdotes from those postings, especially about contemporary luminaries of journalism, literature and notoriety including Larry Burrows, Jean Larteguy, and Kim Philby.

  4. says:

    The subtitle of AHBR SE is, A Foreign Correspondent s Life Behind the Lines But arelevant subtitle for today would be, Tales from the Age of Big Budget Journalism Behr worked for LIFE, TIME, NEWSWEEK, SATURDAY EVENING POST, and Reuters in the 1950s, 60s, and 70s, reporting from hot spots such as India during partition, Algeria during the war of independence with France, the Belgian Congo during de colonization, and the American war in Vietnam amongst other places The title of the bo The subtitle of AHBRSE is, A Foreign Correspondent s Life Behind the Lines But arelevant subtitle for today would be, Tales from the Age of Big Budget Journalism Behr worked for LIFE, TIME, NEWSWEEK, SATURDAY EVENING POST, and Reuters in the 1950s, 60s, and 70s, reporting from hot spots such as India during partition, Algeria during the war of independence with France, the Belgian Congo during de colonization, and the American war in Vietnam amongst other places The title of the book, incidentally, is just a throw away line Behr overheard from a BBC television reporter The book is chiefly tales of adventure You won t find many great truths about journalism handed down from on high but in the introduction Behr does note that, For obvious reasons, which include the short attention span of readers and economic necessities of publishers, what becomes news is not always, not often, what deserves to be singled out for publication p x I suspect that Behr, rather early on abandoned any motivations he might have had about changing the world for the better, and simply embarked on his career for the adventure of it all It makes for a good read

  5. says:

    I read this book after seeing it reccommended as one of Mariella Frostrup s favourite books What makes a good travelogue is the acuity and wit of the observer This is why V.S Naipaul books despite their insightful observation are a little dry to read Edward Behr s writing ishumorous and this is what makes the book readable Unfortunately, despite some salient observations, this book does read like a diary The quality of the anecdotes makes it worth your while along with some interestin I read this book after seeing it reccommended as one of Mariella Frostrup s favourite books What makes a good travelogue is the acuity and wit of the observer This is why V.S Naipaul books despite their insightful observation are a little dry to read Edward Behr s writing ishumorous and this is what makes the book readable Unfortunately, despite some salient observations, this book does read like a diary The quality of the anecdotes makes it worth your while along with some interesting glimpses into the life of a reporter

  6. says:

    This was a fascinating memoir of a foreign correspondent, Edward Behr The title refers to a bizarre and callous approach of another journalist when Belgians were being evacuated from Belgian Congo Zaire He pursued conflict from continent to continent leading to some disturbing, some funny, some interesting stories Apparently the U.S publisher insisted on changing the title to something completely innocuous, Bearings A Foreign Correspondent s Life Behind the Lines, which according to his obi This was a fascinating memoir of a foreign correspondent, Edward Behr The title refers to a bizarre and callous approach of another journalist when Belgians were being evacuated from Belgian Congo Zaire He pursued conflict from continent to continent leading to some disturbing, some funny, some interesting stories Apparently the U.S publisher insisted on changing the title to something completely innocuous, Bearings A Foreign Correspondent s Life Behind the Lines, which according to his obit inThe Guardian , led to a decline in sales He brought back the original title in subsequent editions.From his upbringing as the child of Russian Jewish immigrants in France and England to his experiences of wars in Algeria, Congo, India, China, Vietnamhe is uniformly observant and interesting And he s not afraid to poke fun at himself

  7. says:

    Like The Farm above, I bought this from Ayr s best second hand charity book shop, and surprised myself by managing to finish it Perhaps this was because some of the best chapters were at the end and covered Vietnam, where the absurdity of what was going on and how battles were fought was really well conveyed Books and accounts like this must have inspired Apocalypse Now , and the author pulls no punches about the use and abuse of drugs throughout the conflict I have a suspicion, however, t Like The Farm above, I bought this from Ayr s best second hand charity book shop, and surprised myself by managing to finish it Perhaps this was because some of the best chapters were at the end and covered Vietnam, where the absurdity of what was going on and how battles were fought was really well conveyed Books and accounts like this must have inspired Apocalypse Now , and the author pulls no punches about the use and abuse of drugs throughout the conflict I have a suspicion, however, that this kind of reportage is written to glamorise the life of the war correspondent, but Behr manages to rise above that although he often bitches about rival journalists who pretended they were at the front line So I suppose it must have been interesting enough but, having just finished it, I can t really remember that much about anything else

  8. says:

    Picked this up for its weird title which refers to a question shouted out by a war correspondent walking through a group of war victims in Africa, if I remember correctly at a flea market, and read it as an entertaining collection of war correspondent anecdotes Being an economist the one I ve told the most often is how a small island ended up using Monopoly money during WWII and how this became one of the most valuable currencies since the printing presses of all the other currencies were r Picked this up for its weird title which refers to a question shouted out by a war correspondent walking through a group of war victims in Africa, if I remember correctly at a flea market, and read it as an entertaining collection of war correspondent anecdotes Being an economist the one I ve told the most often is how a small island ended up using Monopoly money during WWII and how this became one of the most valuable currencies since the printing presses of all the other currencies were running hot

  9. says:

    Probably one of the best reporter s memoirs in existence Very interesting material on a range of African and Asian countries in the 50s and 60s including Algeria, China, and Vietnam It has the added virtue of being only slightly self congratulatory, and often very funny It is not for nothing that the book starts with an acknowledgement to Evelyn Waugh s Scoop , since the sometimes farcical scenes in this book often resemble the fictional one s in Waugh s masterpiece.

  10. says:

    Mr Behr is the type of reporter in other words, a professional smart ass which I aspired to someday become in my misspent youth This memoir is an enjoyable and absorbing read, and the author, despite his conversational and eminently readable style, manages to convey quite a large measure of information about some of theor less, as the case may be obscure events of the mid to late 20th century Well worth reading.

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