[Epub] ❧ The Plague Dogs Author Richard Adams – Dcrjservices.co.uk

The Plague Dogs files The Plague Dogs, read online The Plague Dogs, free The Plague Dogs, free The Plague Dogs, The Plague Dogs 652c21e2a Richard Adams, The Author Of Watership Down, Creates A Lyrical And Engrossing Tale, A Remarkable Journey Into The Hearts And Minds Of Two Canine Heroes, Snitter And RowfAfter Being Horribly Mistreated At A Government Animal Research Facility, Snitter And Rowf Escape Into The Isolation, And Terror, Of The Wilderness Aided Only By A Fox They Call The Tod, The Two Dogs Must Struggle To Survive In Their New Environment When The Starving Dogs Attack Some Sheep, They Are Labeled Ferocious Man Eating Monsters, Setting Off A Great Dog Hunt That Is Later Intensified By The Fear That The Dogs Could Be Carriers Of The Bubonic Plague


10 thoughts on “The Plague Dogs

  1. says:

    I hated this book I will never read it again, ever, as long as I live And it absolutely deserves five stars.The Plague Dogs is one of the most visceral, wrenching, emotional reads you ll ever find It follows the fortunes of two dogs, Snitter and Rowf, who escape from a medical testing lab In an attempt to cover up the unnecessary nature of the research done there, the humans running the lab start a media scare about the dogs, claiming that they carry a serious virus which may kill humans In I hated this book I will never read it again, ever, as long as I live And it absolutely deserves five stars.The Plague Dogs is one of the most visceral, wrenching, emotional reads you ll ever find It follows the fortunes of two dogs, Snitter and Rowf, who escape from a medical testing lab In an attempt to cover up the unnecessary nature of the research done there, the humans running the lab start a media scare about the dogs, claiming that they carry a serious virus which may kill humans In this way, the dogs find themselves effectively on their own, without a person to turn to for help or kindness.The dogs fall in with Tod, a fox with a thick Scottish accent, who gives them advice as they attempt to adapt to the harsh realities of living as wild animals But dogs are not wild animals they crave and need the companionship of people and as Snitter and Rowf try to reconcile their need for humanity with their circumstances as de facto wild animals, they remember and relive the better times, when they were pets, before they ended up at the lab.It s an emotionally grinding book, bleak and ultimately painful The final scene is tragic and still brings tears to my eyes as I remember it,than fifteen years after reading the novel It s the kind of story that, once you ve visited it a single time, will remain with you, powerfully, for life And for that, along with Adams gorgeous writing and deft storytelling, it deserves five stars andBut because it s too bleak to read again, I can never really love this book I can respect very deeply the message it conveys and the skill of the author in telling such an honest, affecting story But I just can t like this book


  2. says:

    I really enjoy Richard Adams Part of it is his writing he has an excellent style and a definite gift for description When he talks about a place, it is immediately obvious that he s actually been there He uses multiple senses to tell you what a place looks, sounds and smells like, the feeling of the damp earth and the rolling mists, the tastes that seep through the air Not surprising when one is writing a book where a pair of dogs are the primary characters.And that s another reason I l I really enjoy Richard Adams Part of it is his writing he has an excellent style and a definite gift for description When he talks about a place, it is immediately obvious that he s actually been there He uses multiple senses to tell you what a place looks, sounds and smells like, the feeling of the damp earth and the rolling mists, the tastes that seep through the air Not surprising when one is writing a book where a pair of dogs are the primary characters.And that s another reason I like Adams Lots of people write books about animals, personifying them and making them into almost humans But most of these writers tend to idealize the animals, put them into the sort of noble savage category which places humanity immediately in the wrong.Not Adams His animals are animals In Watership Down, which was ostensibly a book for children, the animals live through fear, terror, despair and war There is blood and death and pain, mostly because there is blood and death and pain in the natural world He does acknowledge that he over humanizes his characters, but without that, there would be no story.This book is about the intersection of animals and man, and asks a very important question what is humanity s responsibility towards the animals While he may not know what the true answer is, Adams definitely knows which answers are wrong The book begins in a scientific research lab, in the quiet hills of northern England, where any number of experiments are performed on any number of animals Some of them are paid for by outside interests cosmetics corporations, for example while others are performed to, in the mind of the lab s directors, further the scope of scientific knowledge Adams utter contempt for this kind of activity is immediately evident when you read it, and he spares no detail in describing what happens in these experiments Animals mutilated, burned, shocked, frozen, exposed to poisons in their air, water and food Kept awake, asleep, isolated all just to see what would happen And when they die, they are disposed of with nothought than one might dispose of a burned out light bulb.One of the subjects is a large black mongrel dog which is being used to answer the great burning scientific question of, What would happen if we kept trying to drown a dog but never actually let it die Rowf having never had a master, his name is just the sound he makes has a single companion in the lab, in the cage next to him a small terrier who, having had a master before, has a name Snitter Snitter has been the subject of a far stranger experiment, and the brain surgery has left a deep scar across his skull and a deeper rift in his mind.The two dogs manage to escape from the lab into the outside world, where they manage to survive, if only barely.And normally, that would be the end of the story But then Adams reveals his antipathy for bureaucracy and the modern media, for where both of these intersect, terrible phantoms and ghouls can arise Worried farmers, whose sheep are targets of the two hungry dogs, call their representatives to get answers from the recalcitrant lab The ministers talk and talk about it, and when word leaks out to a well known London tabloid, the story explodes.WAS the lab not working with many kinds of animals the night the dogs escaped, it asked Among those animals, were there not RATS And were those rats not the subjects of tests involving the horrible BLACK PLAGUE CAN the laboratory ASSURE the taxpaying public that there is ABSOLUTELY NO CHANCE, none at all that the dogs are not infected with the virulent PLAGUE The newspaper s answer, the one that will sellcopies, of course, is NO And so, the two dogs, who were lucky enough to escape and canny enough to survive, become known nationwide as the Plague Dogs, subjects of a hunt which escalates beyond reasonable proportions.As much as this is an animal adventure story, a kind of twisted version of Homeward Bound, it is also commentary There s a lot of dog philosophy in here, for one of Adams gifts is being to get into the heads of the animals he s writing The two dogs agree on one thing it is a dog s place in the world to serve humanity But how Snitter, who d had a good master once, believes that they are there to make humans happy, to bring love to a home Rowf, however, having known nothing other than the laboratory, believes that dogs are there to be abused by humans for their unknowable purposes, and that by running away from the lab and the water tank, he has become a Bad Dog.Also, looking at the world from a dog s perspective is interesting Snitter, for example, believes that the newspaper boy delivers a paper to the Master s house solely so the Master and Snitter can play a fun game Isn t that boy nice And having known only suburbia, he is shocked that humans have ripped up the world and replaced it with all these green things and mountains and deep holes filled with water which, of course, Rowf believes are used to drown unthinkably huge animals much as he was drowned Adams asked himself the question, How would a dog interpret the world and got a lot of great ideas from it.And, as I mentioned before, there s a lot of talk about humanity s responsibility towards the animals Should we use them for whatever purposes we wish Of course not Are we necessarily better than the other animals More skilled, yes,clever, certainly, but better No We are animals, and as such we cannot allow ourselves to place ourselves above the great interconnected web of life We may never know what our purpose in Nature is, but we can know what our purpose is not.By the way, there s an animated movie of this one, too, done by the same house that did Watership Down I haven t seen it in years, but if I recall, it s absolutely heartbreaking The ending to this book is a bit different, but there is a wonderful section near the end where the Writer and the Reader argue about the fate of the dogs It s a little meta fictional, but it s an acknowledgment by Adams that he knows how the story should end, and he knows how his readers want it to end


  3. says:

    I have to disagree with the reviewer who says this is not realistic I worked in a government lab in California only 2 years ago Things have not changed There are simplyorganizations and welfare groups that have no actual say in day to day operations of labs It s up to researchers and workers to follow the rules daily, and they always know when the inspections will happen.Also, animal labs do use and buy animals from shelters for experiments Back in 2006 for sure, Ingham County Anima I have to disagree with the reviewer who says this is not realistic I worked in a government lab in California only 2 years ago Things have not changed There are simplyorganizations and welfare groups that have no actual say in day to day operations of labs It s up to researchers and workers to follow the rules daily, and they always know when the inspections will happen.Also, animal labs do use and buy animals from shelters for experiments Back in 2006 for sure, Ingham County Animal Control in Michigan regularly sold animals for 5 10 to resellers who then sold them to Michigan State University Where it s legal, it happens Many experiments only require an animal in general, not lab stock, sad to say Sadly, there is no daily oversight in labs Animals are still treated this way The best line is when Rolf states, Surely some good must come of this Truly, animal labs are a business They don t want business to go away This book gives all perspectives locals, the animals themselves, the military the good, the bad, the risks, the benefits I recommend it wholeheartedly


  4. says:

    What s a harangue Well, a harangue, said Mr Powell, it s sort of well, if I make a very intense, excited sort of speech, about animals or something Well, I ve been harangued thoroughly by mr Adams on the subject of scientific experiments on animals not a spoiler Adams is clearly against it, in all circumstances.An author is of course entitled to be passionate about his subject, it s even a desirable trait, and I am a big fan of several of his other novels But with The Plague D What s a harangue Well, a harangue, said Mr Powell, it s sort of well, if I make a very intense, excited sort of speech, about animals or something Well, I ve been harangued thoroughly by mr Adams on the subject of scientific experiments on animals not a spoiler Adams is clearly against it, in all circumstances.An author is of course entitled to be passionate about his subject, it s even a desirable trait, and I am a big fan of several of his other novels But with The Plague Dogs he sort of lost me with his extremely negative portrait of a research station where all the projects mentioned are not only trivial, but sadistic and gratuitously offensive Kind of like Richard Dawkins with his fierce attacks on religion, Adams refuses to see any benefit from the practice and believes hyperbole is a good tool to make his point The scientists are all incompetents or callous brutes, compared repeatedly to Nazis, emperor Nero or wildlife poachers I understand the need to make the reader feel sympathy for the victims, especially the two dogs who are effectively tortured for useless experimental data, but such blatant manipulation of information is a major turnoff for me I guess I should have put the book down once I saw where it was headed, but I do like Adams as a storyteller, and I am always curious to see where a story is headed once I started itFreedom that consuming goal above doubt or criticism, desired as moths desire the candle or emigrants the distant continent waiting to parch them in its deserts or drive them to madness in its bitter winters Freedom, that land where rogues, at every corner, cozen with lies and promises the plucky sheep who judged it time to sack the Shepherd Rowf and Snitter are two of the animals subject to experiments but, beingresourceful that their mates in the cages, they manage to escape from the concentration camp research station in an epic struggle that the author describes in terms echoing the style of Dante s Inferno But the hard won freedom is not at all they expected to find The Lake District in Northern England may be a tourist paradise in summer, but at the tail end of autumn it is a harsh place for survival and for escaping pursue Most of the novel is an extremely detailed description of the dog s struggle to find food on the high moors, with side chapters detailing the actions of the local shepherds, baffled scientists, shady politicians and the efforts of the yellow press to turn the story into a series of sensationalist articles The person responsible for attaching the plague appellation to the escapees is another malicious caricature of an investigative reporter Digby DriverPrivacy, reticence and human worth melted before him like ghosts at cockcrowIt s emotions that sell popular newspapers, old boy, not logical arguments, as you very well know Adams himself is in the business of selling emotions, and I bought it wholesale in Watership Down , but this time around I found it very hard to swallow the clear divide between black scientists, press, politicians and white the dogs mostly, with a wild fox thrown in for a dig at traditional hunts.On the plus side the love for nature is evident in the lengthy descriptions of the Lake District the plot sort of holds together in the end the attempts to created a dog s mythology are occasionally funnyO mutton bones, chicken and cheese,they re things that are certain to please, but what I like the mostis a jolly lamp post On the minus side the lecture was extremely slow, with the same descriptions of nature slowing the pacing considerably and with the local dialect used by both humans and animals too thick even for me, who loves to read Scottish and Irish novels for the local slang I did feel for the struggle of the two animals, but the push from the author in the direction he wanted me to go was I felt heavy handedI think that for ordinary, non specialist people, a certain amount of anthropomorphism s probably useful in helping them to arrive at feeling and sympathy for animals Conclusion disappointment of the year for me from a favorite author, but your mileage might vary Adams remains a gifted storyteller, but I got the feeling he is one of those people who would want me to stop going to the zoo, or to the circus or to enjoy my foie gras because it is against his convictions


  5. says:

    I rarely re visit books that I start and don t complete in one try I am so glad that I received this in a book exchange and returned to the adventures of Snitter and Rowf These two dogs find themselves in a facility that performs various experiments on all manner of animals I won t go into details here, but if you are sensitive to this issue, I would recommend skimming certain portions of the book.Snitter had an owner in his life before the facility and longs to return to this loving environm I rarely re visit books that I start and don t complete in one try I am so glad that I received this in a book exchange and returned to the adventures of Snitter and Rowf These two dogs find themselves in a facility that performs various experiments on all manner of animals I won t go into details here, but if you are sensitive to this issue, I would recommend skimming certain portions of the book.Snitter had an owner in his life before the facility and longs to return to this loving environment He keeps the stories of his man in mind as he and Rowf traverse the countryside Once the dogs escape, there are a number of people that come to want to see their demise, among them government officials and doctors that work at the facility What Adams does here is give voice to not just the dogs in the story, but also everyone involved in what is happening as a result of the two dogs escaping You hear from a journalist covering the story a scientist that leaks information to the press the sister of the owner of Snitter the military called on to help rid the countryside of the dogs There is the use of verse and an interesting narrative Adams employs throughout the book I am glad I took this journey with Snitter and Rowf


  6. says:

    Emotionally over wrought and not very well anchored in the reality of research This type of book has lead to people believing all labs just use any animal of any type for prurient vivisection I work in labs and there are no animals not bred for lab use by specialists To compare results the animals must be very limited in their genetic diversity they are not common pet store animals Of course most were mice but there were rats and rabbits in some labs My own work with mice was to create knoc Emotionally over wrought and not very well anchored in the reality of research This type of book has lead to people believing all labs just use any animal of any type for prurient vivisection I work in labs and there are no animals not bred for lab use by specialists To compare results the animals must be very limited in their genetic diversity they are not common pet store animals Of course most were mice but there were rats and rabbits in some labs My own work with mice was to create knockout mice to model human genetic diseases Once the mouse line is established studies of the disease etiology and of drug efficacy can trialed No lab would buy stolen pets that may harbor disease and offer too broad a genetic variance No one who spends their careers developing medicines to relieve suffering is going to be heartless when it comes to the animals used.I remember once our mouse house facility received a series of letters from hysterical people seeking their lost pets They had been informed we did animal work by some local variant of animal rights group, but one that never checked the validity of their reports since all we ever had was lab bred mice The campaign had to be passed to the police and led only to massive suffering by the pet owners who had been so sadly mislead


  7. says:

    2015 Reading Challenge week 7 Nonhuman characters Well, that was quite an adventure Not as well done as Adamspopular classic, Watership Down, perhaps but still well worth reading Two badly treated dogs, Rowlf and Snitter, escape from Animal Research, Scientific and Experimental lab A.R.S.E gotta love it , in the beautiful English Lake District The dogs have no idea how to survive in the wild but fortunately make friends with a wise fox tod who gives them advice and warnings T 2015 Reading Challenge week 7 Nonhuman characters Well, that was quite an adventure Not as well done as Adamspopular classic, Watership Down, perhaps but still well worth reading Two badly treated dogs, Rowlf and Snitter, escape from Animal Research, Scientific and Experimental lab A.R.S.E gotta love it , in the beautiful English Lake District The dogs have no idea how to survive in the wild but fortunately make friends with a wise fox tod who gives them advice and warnings They band together to hunt, killing sheep and stealing chickens from farmyards whenever they can Of course, that infuriates the farmers who raise a ruckus At first the lab refuses to comment on whether they have lost any dogs, which seems disingenuous and suspicious, but a sharp reporter is assigned to ferret out the news story Unfortunately, he isinterested in advancing his career and selling newspapers than in telling the truth and spreads the rumor that the lab has been doing bubonic plague testing and the dogs may have been infected The resulting panic and a few unfortunate accidents deaths bring out the heavy reinforcements to hunt down the vicious animals Lots of heart wrenching moments and some surprising plot twists turns make for a very satisfying read Rating the book was hard though I vascillated but settled on 4 stars even though there were several things to criticize about the writing that could have knocked it down to 3 if I hadn t felt such sympathy for the dogs and their plight Some bones of contention for me Conversations in dialect may have been deemed authentic but make for some pretty heavy going, even with the small glossary Adams includes for American readers Twenty nine illustrations of the landscape by A Wainwright and Adams beautiful descriptions bring the Lake District countryside to life, but occasionally he doesn t seem to realize when enough is enough Sadly, these and several head scratching digressions tend to slow down the story s momentum In a peculiar way, Adams inserts himself into the story now and then, talking to the reader as an aside, which seems a bit strange and jarring while reading a story being told in the third person And he takes one notable occasion to harangue about how animals should be treated by humans while building up to the conclusion of an important and emotional scene The two men involved in this conversation go so far as to mention Richard Adams as a well intentioned author who knew next to nothing about rabbits Tongue in cheek joke, I suppose, but still a bit weird at that moment The book was written in the year 1977 which I recall as being a time when there was a big outcry about the cruel way cosmetic products were being tested on animals and gruesome horror stories and photos abounded which makes me wonder if Adams chose to write this book at that time with perhaps the hope that people would read it and be swayed to become activists for animal rights PETA People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals was founded shortly thereafter, in March of 1980


  8. says:

    If you have known me for any period time, you probably know that Watership Down is my all time favorite novel So, you may be surprised to learn that I have just now read The Plague Dogs That s odd, right You would think I would be practically falling over myself to read this, and I did try to, years ago I think I was in high school when I bought my first copy, and I couldn t even finish the first chapter This may have been one of my earliest DNFs.Before I read Watership Down I saw the film If you have known me for any period time, you probably know that Watership Down is my all time favorite novel So, you may be surprised to learn that I have just now read The Plague Dogs That s odd, right You would think I would be practically falling over myself to read this, and I did try to, years ago I think I was in high school when I bought my first copy, and I couldn t even finish the first chapter This may have been one of my earliest DNFs.Before I read Watership Down I saw the film as a young child Years later I learned that the film was based on a book, and I immediately read it I loved it so much that I was overjoyed to discover that Adams had other novels, and that those books had very good reviews as well I took my allowance to my favorite independent bookstore and bought my first copy of The Plague Dogs which I still own I pretty much knew most of what was going to happen when I read Watership Down, since the film follows the book rather closely However, I knew almost nothing about The Plague Dogs, and as a teen I was completely unprepared for the subject matter.Evenso than Watership Down, The Plague Dogs is Adams opus against animal cruelty The book starts at a horrendous facility in the Lake District in England called Animal Research Scientific and Experimental or apty, ARSE, for short In the first few pages, the scientist are testing a dog to see how long it takes him to drown in a pool of water before they resuscitate him and do it all over again the next day I couldn t read past these pages the first time I picked up the novel, and I ve heard quite a few other people say the same thing Now that I have finished the novel I can finally say that I am so glad I gave it another chance.As an animal lover, this book is incredibly hard to read, but it is so worth it Adams writing is poetic and brilliant, and his message strong and deeply important Two of the dogs in the research facility manage to escape, and the remainder of the novel involves their fight for survival in the Lake District as one misfortune after another befalls them, and ultimately leaves them hunted by every man in the area, including the government The story switches between dog and human POVs, and Adams even breaks the forth wall in the last few pages to address the horrors of animal cruelty I didn t know if I would be able to make it through the entire book, but I m so happy that I did I cannot recommend this book highly enough Once again Richard Adams has left me astonished and amazed This story will stay with me forever


  9. says:

    Bit of a spoiler following as I am discussing the book, itself, not just the jacket Also, much of the book resembles the animated film, but the ending is entirely different the film stops while the novel keeps going.This novel chronicles medical experimentation in horrific detail It is depressing, as many have said, but what makes it depressing is that it forces the reader to face profoundly shameful things that happen, or have happened, quite frequently, things that we allow or have allowed Bit of a spoiler following as I am discussing the book, itself, not just the jacket Also, much of the book resembles the animated film, but the ending is entirely different the film stops while the novel keeps going.This novel chronicles medical experimentation in horrific detail It is depressing, as many have said, but what makes it depressing is that it forces the reader to face profoundly shameful things that happen, or have happened, quite frequently, things that we allow or have allowed to happen to various animals What I am saying is that much of the book is a kind of propoganda, in the truest sense of the word Adams shows us where our cosmetics and medicines and many other things come from, most effectively with blinded bunnies who act as a kind of symbolic Godhead, watching all that happens He seems to want us to be horrified and ashamed, which makes much of the book difficult to read Towards the end, though, he does something really interesting The book is progressing to a logical end, and Adams steps in with a nice postmodern trick and adopts the voice of the reader addressing him, the author How can you end it like this the reader essentially says Aah, Adams may well be saying, how can YOU let it end like this Adams then introduces a pair of environmentalists who discuss Adams own work, not necessarily positively and appear poised to miraculously change the tide Adams also goes back and touches on certain characters, one of the scientists, especially, and fleshes them out for the first time, showing the reader a little bit of perspective, which raises the book from propaganda into the novel form But since the reader has experienced 300 pages of animal torture previous, 15 pages of well meaning hardly displaces the shame It is an obviously false happy turn Adams is showing us I found this fascinating and very well done Readers of Watership Down and nothing else , I would think, would be lost and very disappointed with this book I say this because I am considering WD as a sort of advanced YA or kids fiction book This is definately not that This is a very complex novel, the sort of thing I wished I d been able to read in college instead of having to read Beowolf 4 times Nothing against Beowolf, it s the 4 times that got me I can t say that I enjoyed this book, but the ending was very well done So I ll let it stand and say well done to Mr Adams


  10. says:

    I started this book at least ten times before I could read past the first chapter This book will destroy the heart of any animal lover It is the story of two animals that escape from an animal testing lab from the point of view of the animals While the writing can be hard to absorb as Adams tries to show the mental condition of the characters, the tale is well worth the read It seems to me to be a good way to step out of what we know and see the world from a different set of eyes.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *